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rainbow communes?

topic posted Tue, August 16, 2005 - 2:06 PM by  chris
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hey, young blud here, hailing from matawana new jersey. i've only really been to one nattional and a few regionals, but the way of life is perfect for me. i was wondering, i know there are rainbow communes out there, but does anybody have an opinion on the topic of self sustaining communities? it would be a miracle a blessing, a gift, and a godsend, all wrapt into one if rainbow could live straight off the land. that's my opinion at least. my prayer. if anybody knows of some farms that need help, i would be glad to support them sometime in the future.
luvin you family!
posted by:
chris
New Jersey
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    Re: rainbow communes?

    Wed, August 17, 2005 - 12:08 PM
    I don't know of any communities that live strictly off the land. There is no commune I have heard of that is 100% self-sustained, things have just changed too much for that to be realistic in these times.

    The most effective, workable communities (the ones that last) tend to grow a portion of their own food, and many live off the grid, yet do things like teach classes on healing, permaculture, etc. in order to make sure all of their needs are met. At the same time, they are teaching those in "Babylon" some wonderful skills and letting them know there is another option than the rat race.

    They are not like Rainbow Gatherings, which are temporary by necessity (seeing as how they still are dependent on "Babylon" for clothes, most food, cigarettes, gas, etc.). Also, in a community, everyone has to pitch in and you don't find people sitting around saying "dose me". They involve a lot of hard work, both physically and interpersonally. It is NOT easy! However, the payoff from all that hard work is a very honest and "real" way of living, including the feeling of really having a family that works (provided you're not in a dysfunctional community, which there is no shortage of).

    Keep in mind that most communites fail because people like the idea of living in a commune but have no real idea how to, or they don't have the emotional maturity to deal with each other effectively, or they have no form of income, etc. If you're going to get into one, really trust your gut and make sure it's right for you. You may experience several communities before you find one that fits you.

    If you want to find some communes to visit, I suggest checking out www.ic.org
    They have a communities directory. Just keep in mind that communities generally don't like to be dropped in on. Contact them first and make arrangements. I'd suggest checking out a few of them and finding what really works for you. Many of them offer situations where you can stay for a while in exchange for helping out. Some ask for money in order to cover your food and utility expenses. Some are completely closed. Some are quite open. Almost all require some kind of "checking you out" period of usually about a year before they'll accept anyone as a member.

    I hope you find one that works for you!